How can I find out when my house was built?

Want to find out how old your house is or when it was built? There are many ways to find the age of your property.

One easy way is to look at the architecture of the house. Look for indicators such as:

  • Style of the doors
  • Architraves around the doors
  • Windows and roof
  • Type of construction

If you’re unsure and want additional help, our we buy any house and sell house fast agents could be of assistance.

All out dates are approximate, the accuracy of the estimate cannot be guaranteed of matching your home. If you require a precise date for an important reason such as buildings insurance we recommend that you obtain the opinion of a chartered surveyor after inspection of the property. Land Registry records can also be a good way of arriving at a date of construction as well as giving interesting information about former owners.

Properties built built pre 1700

Due to such varied construction techniques for the property it is hard to be specific without further information. Land Registry or even Parish records might help and who knows, it may even be mentioned in the Doomsday Book!

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

Flint Stone Wall thatched roofrustic door

Properties built between 1700 to 1750

Due to generally wooden construction in this period, not many homes survive. Those that do tend to be have been built for wealthier individuals and are often in our city centres.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

rustic door

Properties built between 1750 to 1800

Construction techniques improved greatly in this period which means that many properties have survived unless they fell prey to over-zealous town planners in recent years.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

Shutters

Properties built between 1800 and 1850

From Georgian into the Victorian era, this was a boom time for building with properties beginning to adopt layouts and styles we easily recognise today.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

Basement
Shutters
Shutters

Properties built between 1850 to 1880

This mid-Victorian era is a time when many of our towns and cities expanded at a tremendous rate.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

Plaster arch in hallatticStained glass

Artexed ceilings

Properties built between 1880 and 1910

From the Victorian era into Edwardian at the height of the British Empire, millions of homes were constructed for the rapidly growing, more prosperous population.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

Plaster arch in hallTiled front step

Properties built between 1910 and 1925

From Edward VIII to George V there was very little building in the mid-period due to the demands for men and material for the First World War.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

Tiled front step

Bay Windows

Properties built between 1925 to 1939

An era when a 3-bed semi in suburbia was the aspiration of millions. The introduction of cavity wall construction helped to make homes warmer and less prone to dampness.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

picture-railTiled front stepCoal store

Properties built between 1939 to 1949

Construction of homes virtually stopped from 1939 to 1945 as World War 2 took supplies and labour but demand was high immediately afterwards when returning soldiers expected decent housing.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

Coal store

Parquet flooring
Parquet flooring

Properties built between 1949 and 1960

The post-war boom saw prefabs replaced with council and private houses built with modern brick, good ventilation, fitted kitchens and central heating.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

Coal store

Properties built between 1960 and 1970

Huge suburban estates and tower blocks were built to house a growing population who expected ‘all mod cons’.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

Properties built between 1970 and 1980

Economic crisis in the 70’s subdued demand for new homes. With increased car use, a garage became an essential item on many more buyer’s wish lists.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below

garage door

Properties built between 1980 and 1990

As Thatcherism gained momentum, millions took the chance to buy their council houses and a building boom began. Yuppies began to look to city centres to buy their new pads. Artexed ceilings also made a bit of a comeback too!

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below

garage door

Properties built between 1990 to 2000

Early 90’s economic troubles turned to boomtime for developers by the end of the decade – just don’t mention the dotcom bubble!

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below

garage door

Properties built between 2000 to 2010

Bust in the early 2000’s soon turned to boom once again with smaller homes being built to cope with increased demand from owners and buy to let investors keen to take advantage of higher rents.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

BricksDouble glazed windowsgarage door

Properties built between 2010 to present

Much talk of a ‘broken property market’ with too few new homes being built and sky-high prices in many areas. The younger generation feeling that they have no hope of ever buying a home.

Properties from this period might have visuals such as the below:

Double glazed windowsgarage door

Other ways to find out how old your house is

  • Check with the solicitor you used when buying the property, they may have kept a copy
  • If you have a mortgage, your survey may say how old the building is
  • Your local authority may have further details about when planning permission was granted
  • Ask neighbours in the same sort of properties if they know the age of their house
  • Check the property deeds for further information about when the house was constructed

If you have lost the deeds to your property you should inquire with the land registry to get a new copy of them.

You could also look on old-maps.co.uk which can give you a rough indicator or when your house might have been constructed, it is an archive of old maps and you may be able to see when your house first appears on this.

When was my house built?

Property expert Jonathan Rolande from House Buy Fast talks about finding out when your house was built, in the video below.

How To Find Out When Your House Was Built

Jonathan Rolande from House Buy Fast answers the common question, how can I find out when my house was build?

Video Transcription

It’s a very interesting subject, a lot of us want to know when our property were build and the history of the property, and of course you are often asked by people like the insurers for the age.

There are lots and lots of clues you can look for, from the style of doors and architraves around the doors, skirting boards, windows, roof, construction, etc, etc.

If you know what you’re looking for it’s quite easy to date a property, however if you don’t know the clues to look for then you can always check the deeds, that would generally show when the property was constructed.

You will see deeds going right back to when the property wasn’t there, when it was just perhaps a farmers field, or something like that.

Then it changes hands and you’ll see that eventually the house is build.

Remember the majority of building was carried out in Victorian times up to about 1901 and then there were gaps in the two World Wars, 1914 – 1918 and 1939 – 1945, almost no properties build then.

So, your house is unlikely to be built in the period.

If you want specific advice on it, ask a local estate agent or surveyor and they should give you all the clues that you need.